According to the National Weather Service in Cheyenne, the capital city saw only 0.11 inches of precipitation last month, making it the driest October in 34 years.

This is the seventh month in a row that Cheyenne has seen less than normal precipitation.

"Unfortunately, 2022's relentless dryness continued through October," the NWS said. "Year-to-date statistics are pretty ugly, with 2022 running as the 6th driest in the 150-year record."

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Cheyenne also failed to pick up any measurable snow last month, something that has not occurred since 2016.

"While the mountains as well as Rawlins and Laramie received some light snow, the high plains are still waiting for the first accumulating snowfall of the season," the NWS said.

"This is unusual for Cheyenne, which typically sees snow by the end of October in almost 90% of years," the NWS added.

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October was a fairly unremarkable month in terms of the weather around our area. Temperatures averaged warmer than normal, but not close to record territory. We lacked much of any extreme warmth or extreme cold. Unfortunately, 2022's relentless dryness continued through October. Cheyenne saw only 0.11”, making it the driest October since 1988 and 7th consecutive drier than average month. Year-to-date statistics are pretty ugly, with 2022 running as the 6th driest in the 150-year record. All other climate sites were drier than average too, with Rawlins fairing the best (just 0.01” below average), and Laramie fairing the worst, recording only 0.06” which made for the 5th driest October on record. While the mountains as well as Rawlins and Laramie received some light snow, the high plains are still waiting for the first accumulating snowfall of the season. This is unusual for Cheyenne, which typically sees snow by the end of October in almost 90% of years.

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